And we're deeply sorry about this picture - WDAM-TV 7-News, Weather, Sports-Hattiesburg, MS

And we're deeply sorry about this picture

A New York congressman says he's sorry for making remarks about Mississippi that some here saw as fightin' words.

In The New York Times last week, Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., talked about wanting to bring more federal money back to his home state, and added: "Mississippi gets more than their fair share back in federal money, but who the hell wants to live in Mississippi?"

Rangel issued a news release Monday night, saying: "There is no excuse for my having said that. I am fully aware that every American loves their respective state and city and I'm afraid that my love and affection for New York got in the way of my common sense and judgment, and for that I sincerely apologize."

Rangel's first remark — which came after Democrats regained the congressional majorities in the midterm elections — prompted indignant letters to the editor, Internet postings and calls to talk radio in Mississippi.

U.S. Rep. Chip Pickering had called on Rangel to apologize and asked whether Mississippi could expect "insults, slander and defamation" from the Democrats in Washington.

Now, Pickering says he accepts Rangel's apology.

"Mississippians are forgiving folks," Pickering said.

The New York Daily News reports that at a Monday breakfast hosted by the Association for a Better New York, Rangel said: "For all of you from Mississippi, I'd like to extend my deepest apologies. I promise I'll visit as soon as I find a food taster."

Pickering said in a news release: "He will not need a food taster to enjoy our hospitality."

Rangel is in line to become chairman of the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee.

In talking about wanting to bring more federal money to New York, he said he used Mississippi as an example because it gets back $1.77 for every $1 it sends to the federal government, and New York gets back 79 cents on the dollar.

 

 

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