How to keep your plants safe during severe weather - WDAM-TV 7-News, Weather, Sports-Hattiesburg, MS

How to keep your plants safe during severe weather

Eric Randall gives WDAM 7 tips on how to protect your plants photo credit: WDAM Eric Randall gives WDAM 7 tips on how to protect your plants photo credit: WDAM
photo credit: WDAM photo credit: WDAM
HATTIESBURG, MS -

While we don't have a hurricane bearing down on us right now, it's never too early to worry about preparing. From your house to your yard, you need to make sure your property is safe from the storm.

During severe weather, it’s easy for small plants to get damaged by heavy wind and rain. Eric Randall is a garden department manager at Lowe’s and said the best way to protect your plants is to move them inside.

“Bring them inside if possible," Randall said. "If not bring them in the car port, garage or even on the front porch."

But if you can’t, Randall suggests you cover them up to keep the plants from getting damaged.

“A five-gallon bucket or large container you can turn upside down over the plant," Randall said. "Make sure you weigh it down with a rock or brick.” 

Small trees can also get easily damaged, so it’s a a good idea to put stakes in the ground and attach them to the tree to keep it stable.

Overall, Randall said the best thing to do is to prepare early, especially if you know a storm is coming.

“Just go ahead and start covering things up and staking newly-planted trees and gathering your container plants,” Randall said.

Copyright WDAM 2016. All rights reserved.

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