Katrina Untold: Robin Roberts, In Her Own Words - WDAM-TV 7-News, Weather, Sports-Hattiesburg, MS

Katrina Untold: Robin Roberts, In Her Own Words

Robin Roberts talks about the resilience of South Missisisppians following Hurricane Katrina Robin Roberts talks about the resilience of South Missisisppians following Hurricane Katrina
HATTIESBURG, MS (WDAM) -

For decades Robin Roberts has been a staple on American television. She began her television career at WDAM-TV News.

“I’m very familiar with the Hub City and Eastabuchie and the people there,” Roberts said.

She’s now the lead anchor on ABC’s Good Morning America, where she has seen and covered many stories throughout the country. But 10 years ago, one story hit a little too close to home. 

“The morning and the morning after Katrina for the country to see me so emotional, I had never done that,” Roberts explained.

 Roberts said she never imagined that her home state of Mississippi would also be home to one of the greatest natural disasters in U.S. history.

In the aftermath of the storm, Robins realized that much of the national attention was placed on New Orleans.

“Yes it’s terrible what happened in New Orleans that was man-made.  That was after the storm, those were the levees breaching. Every bit as important, every bit as tragic, but when you want to talk about Katrina, that’s here,” Roberts added.

So from that point forward, she made it her mission to share the untold stories of South Mississippians.

“I wanted to be able to give voice to the people most affected by it,” Roberts explained.

 Roberts said there are so many remarkable stories of bravery, hope and resilience which make Mississippi one of the best places to call home.

"They did it. They were the ones that were there day in and day out for themselves," said Roberts. "I’m just so very proud to continue to call this home."

Copyright 2015 WDAM.  All rights reserved. 

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