Mississippi, Louisiana wildlife officers arrest men for illegal - WDAM-TV 7-News, Weather, Sports-Hattiesburg, MS

Mississippi, Louisiana wildlife officers arrest men for illegal fishing

JACKSON, MS -

This a news release from the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries & Parks. 

 A joint investigation between the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks (MDWFP) and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) has resulted in the arrest of three Mississippi men.

LDWF and MDWFP officers apprehended Lance O. Davis, 41, and James A. Howard, 51, both of Poplarville, and Howard D. Restor, 40, of Lumberton, at their fish camp about 4 p.m., Tuesday, August 11. Each man was charged by LDWF with a Federal Lacy Act Violation of transporting illegally taken fish from Mississippi to Louisiana. A Lacy Act Violation carries up to a $10,000 fine and five years in jail. All fish, a boat, and illegal equipment were seized.

The subjects were using an illegal snuff can type shocking device sometimes known as a "catfish stunner".

On Wednesday morning August 12, warrants were issued in Mississippi for their arrest. At 3:30 p.m., all three subjects turned themselves in to MDWFP Officers at the Pearl River County Jail. Each face charges of illegal methods of taking fish and unlawful possession which carries a fine of $2000 to $5000 and loss of hunting and fishing privileges for one year.

"Acting on a tip received in January, we contacted the LDWF and began a joint investigation in very harsh conditions," said MDWFP Major Lane Ball. "I want to thank LDWF for their cooperation as we move forward on additional investigations," Ball added.

MDWFP Officers engaged in this investigation were Lieutenant Kallum Herrington, Master Sergeants Kelly Farmer and Mike Jones, Privates Jake Guess, Joey Herrington, and Bryant Deschamps.

Louisiana Officers were Captain Len Yokum, Sergeant Darryl Galloway, and Senior Agent Lee Davis.

Copyright 2015 WDAM. All rights reserved. 

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