19th Annual DuBard Symposium to Focus on Dyslexia, Related Disor - WDAM-TV 7-News, Weather, Sports-Hattiesburg, MS

19th Annual DuBard Symposium to Focus on Dyslexia, Related Disorders

Photo from The University of Southern Mississippi Photo from The University of Southern Mississippi
HATTIESBURG, MS (WDAM) -

The following is a news release from The University of Southern Mississippi

The DuBard School for Language Disorders at The University of Southern Mississippi is hosting the 19th Annual DuBard Symposium: Dyslexia and Related Disorders on September 16-17, 2015 at the Thad Cochran Center on the Southern Miss Hattiesburg campus.

This two-day educational and networking event touts a first-rate collection of sessions on dyslexia and topics surrounding this often-misunderstood written language disorder. Keynote sessions from highly experienced and knowledgeable professionals will kick off the event each day, followed by a multitude of breakout sessions in which participants can choose the programs most fitted to their needs.

Dr. Laure Ames, LPC-S is a licensed psychological associate and licensed professional counselor currently serving as the director of The Shelton Evaluation Center at the Shelton School in Dallas, Texas. Ames, who also co-authored the character education curriculum Choices, will present, “Evaluation of Learning Differences and Related Disorders.”

Dr. Nancy Cushen White, BCET, CALT, QI, LDT is a certified academic language therapist, a board-certified educational therapist, and dyslexia consultant in private practice, who currently works as a clinical professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of California – San Francisco. White, who also serves as a literacy intervention consultant and case manager for the Lexicon Reading Center in Dubai as well as a teacher-training course director for the Slingerland Institute, will present, “Four Converging Paths en Route to Automatic Word Recognition and Spelling.”

These distinguished keynotes will be supplemented by equally notable speakers presenting 11 breakout sessions on topics such as social competence and the learning-different student, auditory processing disorder, ADHD, bullying as it relates to dyslexia, experiencing dyslexia and more. Additionally, vendors will be present offering products and services of interest to symposium attendees.

The DuBard Symposium is recommended for general and special education teachers, speech-language pathologists, dyslexia therapists, health care professionals, school psychologists, school administrators, counselors, parents, students and anyone interested in learning more about dyslexia and related disorders.

The symposium is sponsored by the DuBard School, Mississippi Department of Education, Hattiesburg Clinic Connections, Pine Grove and the International Association Method Task Force.

An early-bird discounted registration is available until August 14; standard registrations will continue to be available through September 7. ASHA, educator and SEMI continuing education units are available.

For more information and to register online visit www.usm.edu/dubard or call 601.266.6777.

Copyright 2015 WDAM. All rights reserved.

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