Local Dr. warns of dangers of kids in hot cars - WDAM-TV 7-News, Weather, Sports-Hattiesburg, MS

Local Dr. warns of dangers of kids in hot cars

Local doctor talks about the dangers of kids being left in hot cars. Local doctor talks about the dangers of kids being left in hot cars.
LAUREL, MS (WDAM) - With temperatures on the rise, a local doctor is sending a warning about the dangers of kids being left in hot cars.

Dr. Ali Naqvi with South Central Regional Medical Center said it is never safe to leave a child unattended in a hot car.

“There is no amount of time that is safe.  It's not even safe to leave them for a minute or two minutes,” Dr. Naqvi said.

Dr. Naqvi said kids succumb to heat faster than adults.

“Just because of their small body size, kids generate more heat usually than adults. Their mechanisms to get rid of all that extra heat is not that well developed. They're more prone to get heat strokes. It can potentially damage their brain. It can cause dehydration, so the consequences can be extremely devastating." Dr. Naqvi added.

According to kidsandcars.org, there are ways to prevent this from happening.  They recommend leaving something like your cell phone, handbag, employee ID or brief case in the back of your car.

The website adds that 38 children die in hot cars each year.

Copyright 2015 WDAM. All rights reserved.
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