Study: Mississippi named least safe state to live in - WDAM-TV 7-News, Weather, Sports-Hattiesburg, MS

Study: Mississippi named least safe state to live in

Mississippi ranked the least safe state to live in according to a new study. Mississippi ranked the least safe state to live in according to a new study.
HATTIESBURG, MS (WDAM) - According to a recent Wallethub study, Mississippi was ranked the least safe state to live in. 

Some of the metrics in the website's data set include the number of assaults per 100,000 residents, the number of fatal occupational injuries per 100,000 employees and the percentage of the population lacking health insurance coverage.

Here is how Mississippi ranked: 

  • 48th – Number of Murders & Non-Negligent Manslaughters per 100,000 Residents 
  • 30th – Estimated Property Losses from Climate Disasters per 100,000 Residents 
  • 43rd – Number of Fatal Occupational Injuries per 100,000 Employees 
  • 49th – Number of Fatalities per 100 Million Vehicle Miles of Travel 
  • 47th – Number of Law Enforcement Employees per 100,000 Residents 
  • 49th – Unemployment Rate 34th – Number of Sex Offenders per 100,000 Residents 
  • 35th – Share of the Population with No Health Insurance 

For the full report, click here.

See how the rest of the nation did in the slideshow above. 

Copyright WDAM 2015. All rights reserved.


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