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Southern Miss Food Research Group to Discuss How to Eat Better March 19

Photo from The University of Southern Mississippi Photo from The University of Southern Mississippi
HATTIESBURG, MS (WDAM) -

The following is a news release from The University of Southern Mississippi

The Southern Miss Food Research Group, a collaboration of various departments at The University of Southern Mississippi that study food, will continue to host “The Culinary Communities of Mississippi: Farm, Table and Campus,” a lecture series that will explore how we cook, eat and grow food in Mississippi starting March 19.

The first lecture of this semester's lecture series will be held on March 19 at 6 p.m. in the Peck House and Asbury Annex where Felder Rushing, a botanist and author of “Slow Gardening”, will present “Slow Gardening and Mississippi's Edible Gardens.”

The Department of Communication, Department of History, Center for the Study of the Gulf South and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute and the Mississippi Humanities Council (MHC) have partnered for the series of lectures which explains the significant role that food plays in our culture. The series will continue at Southern Miss with support from MHC.

“Felder Rushing, Mississippi's gardening expert, will talk to us about what we can do to eat better,” said Dr. Andrew Haley, associate professor of American Cultural History. “We take food for granted, but we shouldn't. Not only is food part of our Southern identity, but also learning how to eat better is key to a healthier future.”

An additional event will follow where Dr. Wendy Atkins-Sayre, associate professor of Communication Studies and director of the Southern Miss Speaking Center, will comment on the talk.

The Southern Miss Food Research Group is a series of lectures and discussions that explores Mississippian's relationship to their food from the farm to the table and the ways in which the study of food might influence our lives. Lectures explore Southern culinary culture, both now and in the past, and the changes we might make in food policy and how we eat.

Atkins-Sayre and Dr. Ashil Q. Stokes, associate professor of Communication Studies at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will give the second lecture in the series on April 1.

For more information about what's happening in the College of Arts and Letters, which these departments are apart, visit http://www.usm.edu/arts-letters/now/.

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