Woman claims sister's murderer uses Facebook from prison - WDAM - TV 7 - News, Weather and Sports

Woman claims sister's murderer uses Facebook from prison

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Recently, Amanda's sister, Andrea Free, noticed her sister's killer posting to Facebook from the Morgan County Correctional Complex. (Photo Source: Facebook) Recently, Amanda's sister, Andrea Free, noticed her sister's killer posting to Facebook from the Morgan County Correctional Complex. (Photo Source: Facebook)
In November of 2003, Stanley Phillip Chapman was indicted for the murder of his wife, Amanda. (Photo Source: WMC Action News 5 file) In November of 2003, Stanley Phillip Chapman was indicted for the murder of his wife, Amanda. (Photo Source: WMC Action News 5 file)
TIPTON COUNTY, TN -

(WMC) - A 2003 murder victim's family claims that the convicted killer is posting to social media while serving time in an East Tennessee prison.

In November of 2003, Stanley Phillip Chapman was indicted for the murder of his wife, Amanda.

Recently, Amanda's sister, Andrea Free, noticed her sister's killer posting to Facebook from the Morgan County Correctional Complex.

Prison officials have since taken the page down, but Free is fighting Nashville to change the rules and stiffen the penalties for prisoners using cell phones and social media from inside prison.

It's been almost 11 years since Amanda was murdered.

"To stumble across something like that. You're online reading your news feed on Facebook and suddenly a name pops up that haunts you, never goes away," said Free.

On Monday, Andrea Free says she was on Facebook when she came across a post with the name Phillip Chapman.

She says she stopped, gave it a second look, and realized it was the same Phillip Chapman who killed her sister Amanda.

"How could this happen? He's in prison? They don't have cell phones or Internet. How could this happen?" asks Free.

Chapman is being housed in the Morgan County Correctional Facility in East Tennessee.

Prison officials say it's a constant battle to interdict, detect, and confiscate all forms of contraband within their facilities.

Andrea Free worries what he's been looking at online.

"Has he been watching our family? Is he sitting in prison plotting a revenge of some sort? Who knows," Free says.

WMC Action News Five asked the Tennessee Department of Correction about this incident. Below is their response:

Tennessee, along with other federal, state, and local correctional systems, is in a constant battle to interdict, detect, and confiscate all forms of contraband within our facilities. The fight against contraband is at the heart of our mission in the Tennessee Department of Correction to operate safe and secure prisons and provide effective community supervision. The Department continues to be proactive in combating the issue with available technology and a never-ending determination to reduce the flow of contraband into our correctional facilities. TDOC utilizes intensive security screenings, actionable intelligence, strategic searches based on statistical data, and best practices from across the country to combat the problem. We have implemented the use of cell phone sensors, body orifice security scanners, increased facility shakedowns, and cell phone detection dogs to enhance our efforts. Facebook has been very cooperative with us in removing pages belonging to inmates right away.

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