Favre: "I don't wanna knock football at all." - WDAM-TV 7-News, Weather, Sports-Hattiesburg, MS

Favre: "I don't wanna knock football at all."

A former American Football quarterback who spent most of his career with the Green Bay Packers, who is now a local high school football coach, did an exclusive interview with a well-known television host on Thursday.

NBC's "Today Show" host, Matt Lauer, visited Hattiesburg for an exclusive interview with legendary quarterback and future Hall-of-Famer, Brett Favre. Favre spoke to Lauer about football, concussions, and his future. The segment aired Monday on NBC's "Today Show."

Over the course of his 20-year career, Favre was sacked 525 times and suffered countless major hits.

Favre said that he's facing memory loss, and said that he could not recall a whole season of his daughter's soccer games.

"I've talked to several doctors about different symptoms and one of them is not being able to finish a sentence or not remembering a specific word," Favre said.

He says that although he's unsure of brain damage from football, that would be the biggest indication of brain damage from the hits he's taken during his football career.

Favre doesn't have a son, but he told Lauer that if he did, he would be leery of him playing football, due to the amount of mental and physical pressure he'd face.

"I could understand in fact that if I had a son, I'd be real leery of him playing, and that sounds and in some respects I'm almost glad that I don't have a son, because of the pressures that he would face, but also the physical toll that it could possibly take on him. Not to mention, if he never made it, he'd be a failure in everyone's eyes," Favre said.

Favre may be the illustration of true grit in the National Football League world, but he tells Lauer that he'd consider being the paradigm of safety, at some point.

"I don't wanna knock football at all," he said.

"I think that would be unfair. I knew what I was getting myself into... But to think maybe I could ease some of the potential trauma, but still keep the integrity of the game... I'm willing to do that."

In the sit-down, Favre discussed the Miami Dolphins' bullying controversy.

"My initial reaction was, you gotta be kiddin' me," Favre said.

"I'm not sayin' it's possible, I'm not sayin' it didn't happen."

Lauer said he's a fan of Favre, and to interview him is a once in a lifetime opportunity.

"He gave an interview recently which was pretty revealing," said Lauer, talking about his years in football, and the outcome of it at least in one area.

"He admits to some memory loss and concussions we all knew he was suffering."

The superintendent of Lamar County Schools says the public can expect more than an interview about football.

"I don't think it's gonna be about just his involvement with our school district," said Ben Burnett, Superintendent of Lamar County Schools.

"But, it will be about Brett's career, and I'm sure anything that he could maybe do over again, or simply his experience in the NFL."

Favre added that without Jesus Christ and his wife, Deanna, he wouldn't be the person he is today.

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