40 or older? A medical test can tell your chance for heart attac - WDAM-TV 7-News, Weather, Sports-Hattiesburg, MS

40 or older? A medical test can tell your chance for heart attack

HATTIESBURG, MS (WDAM) -

HATTIESBURG,MS (WDAM) - Eleven days ago, many people were shocked to find out that radio host Kidd Kraddick died from complications due to cardiac disease. 

He, like some many others, was unaware of this silent killer until it's too late. But this disease doesn't have to be silent. What if you and so many others could get a complete picture of your heart health, and know your risk for a heart attack five to 10 years in the future? Now, there is a way. A cardiologist at Hattiesburg Clinic says you could have that peace of mind for $125.

Hattiesburg Clinic Cardiologist, Dr. Tom Messer says he can't help but to be excited about the life saving capabilities of the Care Program.

"Care Clinic was established as a way to help patients find out if they already have evidence of coronary artery disease," said Messer.

Dr. Messer says once a patient signs up for the Care Program they go through a series of tests.

"We check their fasting lipid profile and blood sugar fasting," said Messer.

Messer says the next evaluation needs no tubes or needles and takes less than five minutes.

"Using computerized technology, CT scanner, we measure the calcium deposit in a patient's heart arteries with that technique," said Messer.

Dr. Messer says technology like this has only been available for the last six years of his 30-year career at the clinic, but it can give patients a glimpse into the future of their heart health.

"We can actually give them a risk assessment and see what their risk of having a heart attack in the next five to ten years is," said Messer.

Physician Assistant Katie Meyers, says the clinic's goal is to decrease the number of people coming in with heart attacks.

"If they are moderate or high then we can help lower their risk," said Meyers.

Meyers says when heart surgery isn't the only choice there are life saving adjustments the patient can make.

"We can work on your blood pressure, your weight, your BMI, lipids, and then go from there," said Meyers.

For more information on the Care Program visit this website.

www.hattiesburgclinic.com/careriskevaluation

HATTIESBURG CLINIC CARDIOLOGIST, DR. TOM MESSER SAYS MATTOCKS STORY EXCITES HIM ABOUT THE LIFE SAVING CAPABILITIES OF THE CARE PROGRAM.

"CARE CLINIC WAS ESTABLISHED AS A WAY TO HELP PATIENTS FIND OUT IF THEY ALREADY HAVE EVIDENCE OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE. "

NATS--WE KNOW THAT PATIENT IS STARTING TO MAKE PLAQUE.

DR. MESSER SAYS ONCE A PATIENT SIGNS UP FOR THE CARE PROGRAM THEY GO THROUGH A SERIES OF TESTS.

" WE CHECK THEIR FASTING LIPID PROFILE AND BLOOD SUGAR FASTING."

THE NEXT EVALUATION NEEDS NO TUBES OR NEEDLES AND TAKES LESS THAN FIVE MINUTES.

"USING COMPUTERIZED TECHNOLOGY, CT SCANNER, WE MEASURE THE CALCIUM DEPOSIT IN A PATIENTS HEART ARTERIES WITH THAT TECHNIQUE."

DR. MESSER SAYS TECHNOLOGY LIKE THIS( SHOW CT SCAN AND MACHINE) HAS ONLY BEEN AVAILABLE  FOR THE LAST SIX YEARS OF HIS 30 YEAR CAREER AT THE CLINIC.. BUT IT CAN GIVE PATIENTS A GLIMPSE INTO THE FUTURE OF THEIR HEART HEALTH.

"WE CAN ACTUALLY GIVE THEM A RISK ASSESSMENT, AND SEE WHAT THEIR RISK OF HAVING A HEART ATTACK IN THE NEXT FIVE TO TEN YEARS IS... "

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT KATIE MEYERS, SAYS THE CLINIC GOAL IS TO DECREASE THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE COMING IN WITH HEART ATTACKS..

"IF THEY ARE MODERATE OR HIGH THEN WE CAN HELP LOWER THEIR RISK."

MEYERS SAYS WHEN HEART SURGERY ISN'T THE ONLY CHOICE, THERE ARE LIFE SAVING ADJUSTMENTS THE PATIENT CAN MAKE.

"WE CAN WORK ON YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE, YOUR WEIGHT, YOUR BMI, LIPIDS, AND THEN GO FROM THERE."

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